What is Viagra for Females?

Sexual desires fluctuate for many women, typically due to changes in relationships, stress, and bodily changes such as pregnancy and menopause. However,10% of women have reduced sex drive, which leads them to distress. The condition is called Hypoactive sexual drive disorder (HSDD).

A few over-the-counter supplements claim to help with the problem, but their effectiveness is limited and generally unproven. This article explores whether Viagra is a safe and effective treatment for low sexual desire in women and what FDA-approved alternatives are now available.

The FDA has just approved two prescription medications to treat HSDD. These medications are frequently referred to as "female Viagra." They are, however, nothing like Viagra and function in the body is quite distinct ways.

Viagra and other comparable medications treat erectile dysfunction, which occurs when a man cannot obtain or maintain a hard enough erection to engage in sexual activity. These men frequently still experience sexual desire, but they cannot physically respond when they want to have sex. The medications work by relaxing the muscles of the penis and increasing blood flow, allowing for an erection.

A variety of circumstances influence female sexual desire. Impaired desire, impaired arousal, impaired climax, or painful sex are just some of the issues that might affect a woman's ability to enjoy sex. Impairment of sexual desire, often known as low libido, is a prevalent sexual dysfunction that affects one out of every three women in the United States. As a result, HSDD demands a more comprehensive approach to treatment. Although some women may take Viagra, it is not yet approved for sexual dysfunction in women.

FDA Approved “Female Viagra”

There Are Two FDA Approved Medicines under the name Female Viagra.


  • Flibanserin (Addyi) is a tablet you take once a day in the evening.


  • Bremelanotide (Vyleesi) is a shot that you give yourself 45 minutes before intercourse in the belly or thigh. One injection is given every 24 hours, and doctors recommend only eight shots every month.

How do these drugs act?

Both medicines increase the activity of neurotransmitters, which are chemical messengers in your brain that help in arousal. It's crucial to remember that neither of these drugs improves sex. Instead, they work with your body to alter your attitude about sex. These drugs interact with your brain areas that control sexual desire, causing more excitement hormones to be released, making you feel more interested in sex.

Your doctor may suggest that you attempt sex education and counseling along with the medicine. You may need hormone therapy if you have any physical concerns that affect sex, such as vaginal dryness.

Where to buy?

To prescribe either medicine, your doctor must first diagnose you with HSDD. They can do so by asking questions like:

  • Have you ever been pleased with your level of sexual desire?

  • Has your sexual desire waned?

  • Is lower libido a problem for you?
    Do you want your sexual desire to increase?

  • Are there any other factors affecting your sex desire (medicine, pregnancy, surgery, stress)?

If you answered "yes" to the first four questions, your low sex desire is due to HSDD.

A woman's need to take medicine for her sexual desire is generally determined by how distressed she feels. It isn't a problem if you aren't concerned about it. Your doctor will also check to see whether it has anything to do with your current situation or relationship. Because if the problem is that you don't like your partner, you can't fix HSDD.

What is the cost of Female Viagra?

Several insurance companies cover HSDD medicines. The cost of flibanserin will vary depending on your insurance plan, but the out-of-pocket cost for 30 pills (1 month's supply) is around $100.

Which is the best option for you?

Both medications come with their own set of issues and risks. Which one you should choose is determined mainly by your personal preferences. Some ladies are adamantly opposed to injections. Others are uninterested in taking a tablet daily. It's advisable to discuss which one would be best for you with your doctor.

Which is the best option for you?

Both medications come with their own set of issues and risks. Which one you should choose is determined mainly by your personal preferences. Some ladies are adamantly opposed to injections. Others are uninterested in taking a tablet daily. It's advisable to discuss which one would be best for you with your doctor.

Risks and Side Effects

The majority of the research has focused on how the drugs act in women who have not yet reached menopause. As a result, the FDA only approved the medications for premenopausal women. Pregnant or breastfeeding women should not use either medicine. Others should avoid using the drugs, especially those who:

  • Have been diagnosed with liver disease.

  • Have been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease.

  • Take medicine for HIV, hepatitis C, or uncontrolled high blood pressure.

They can also interfere with various medications routinely used by women, such as fluconazole, a yeast infection medication, and antibiotics. As a result, it's essential to know what medications you're taking and discuss them with your doctor.

Women who take HSDD drugs, aka female viagra, should avoid drinking alcohol for two hours before taking the pill till the following day, as it might induce dangerously low blood pressure.

Side effects from the medications include:

  • Nausea.

  • Headache.

  • Scrubbing (red, warm skin).

  • Dizziness and fainting are common side effects.

  • Tiredness.

  • Mouth is parched.

  • Your skin and gums may darken as a result of using bremelanotide.

Do These drugs actually work?

Doctors look at whether the patient's sexual desire has changed to determine how successfully these medications treat HSDD. Flibanserin causes "one more sexually meaningful episode every month." This may appear to be a success, while to others, it may not.

There is no such thing as "normal" sex or desire. It all depends on your definition of terms. As a result, a shift in a woman's concern about her sexual desire is frequently a good indicator of how effectively the treatment works.

If you've been taking medicine for eight weeks and haven't noticed any changes, your doctor may advise you to stop using it. Even if both therapies aren't ideal, having two drugs on the market is a step in the right direction.